PART 2: What to know about travel post Brexit (from the EU to the UK, and UK to the EU)

With the Brexit transition period ending on December 31st, 2020 at 11pm, here is what you can expect in your travels between the EU and the UK, as national of either the UK or an EU country, including Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Switzerland, Andorra, San Marino and Vatican City (“UK et al”). The UK government has stated that there will be no changes for citizens of any EU member state currently living in the UK, or vice versa, until June 30th, 2021. If you decide to reside where you are (in UK or EU) and are not already a resident, you must apply for residency in order to remain by June 30th, 2021. If you currently reside outside of the UK or the EU, and want to travel after the end of the transition period, below are changes to keep in mind. 

Travel from the EU et. al to the UK:

  • You will be exempt from getting a visa for holidays and for short-term trips. 
  • You should get a national passport.  However, you will continue to use your national ID cards until October 1, 2021. If you have the following status, you may continue to use your national ID card until December 31, 2025: 
    1. A Swiss Service Provider
    2. An S2 Health Care Worker
    3. A Frontier Permit Worker, or
    4. Have settled or pre-settled status under the EU settlement scheme.
  • If you are driving to the UK, you will need to have the Green Card or another proof of insurance for your vehicle. Your insurance will be acceptable if it is issued in the EU, Andorra, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Serbia or Switzerland.
  • You must have appropriate travel health insurance, since your European Health Insurance card will cease to be valid after December 31, 2020.
  • Upon legal entry, you will still be able to travel throughout the Common Travel Area (CTA), which includes Ireland and the Crown Dependencies (Jersey, Guernsey, and the Isle of Man). All the privileges of the Common Travel Area, including right to work, survive Brexit.

From the UK to the EU, et al:

  • You may travel for tourism and short visits to the EU et. al for 90 days in a 180-day period. However, if you travel to Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus and Romania, your visit to these countries will not count towards the 90-day period. You may need a visa for business travel depending on your destination. 
  • You are advised by the UK government to have a UK passport valid for at least six months and less than 10 years prior to travel, since it is uncertain if you will be able to use your ID for all destination in the EU et al.  If you do not have a passport or your passport has expired, you should renew your passport prior to your travel to the EU at al after January 1, 2021. 
  • You may need an international driving permit to drive in some countries. If you choose to drive, you should also have valid proof of insurance (such as the green card) and a GB sticker.
  • You must have proper travel health insurance as your European Health Insurance Card will expire on December 31, 2020.
  • Your travel to Ireland remains the same under the Common Travel Area agreement, which pre-dated the EU, and shall continue to be in force after Brexit.
  •  For additional support on applying for visas post-Brexit, please consider registering to our Visa Adviser App to get both a do-it-yourself guide as well as hands-on support from a visa consultant. There you will also get information such as the latest travel advisory, real-time currencies, relevant travel forms, and vaccination information.

For additional support on applying for visas post-Brexit, please consider registering to our Visa Adviser App to get both a do-it-yourself guide as well as hands-on support from a visa consultant. There you will also get information such as the latest travel advisory, real-time currencies, relevant travel forms, and vaccination information.

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